Pc

Putting the personal into PC

in
Comment from E-mail

Thank you for putting the personal into PC. As an engineer I appreciate your ethical and moral approach to technogy and your commitment to education.

Woz

I have to be honest. I'm into children being precocious and being somewhat problems. If too heavily protected they might have too boring a life. But when you play tricks on people or take other negative actions (copy software) then you should have some solid, logical, ethical thinking that convinces you that you believe in your reasons enough to tell other people what you do and why. That's the ethical hacker approach.

My own keys to happiness include knowing that I'm good and that logical truth reigns and in knowing that I don't have to convince other people to believe in that which I do. My life was successful when these keys came to me, before college even. Hey, a built-in religion with no church, and no group to agree with all the time, is the best for me. I just stayed very young in my beliefs all these years.

My commitment to education and to children in schools was with me all my life. In the movie they show the time Steve and I and his girl friend wore Alice in Wonderland costumes in a shopping mall. It was a joy of my life. I even took a week's vacation from my job as an engineer at Hewlett Packard to take this minimum wage job. Steve doesn't look back on it as a great thing in life but I do.

Macs Sucks?

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Comment from E-mail

Macs suck. Linux is better and its faster than your unstable Macs. On a last note, MACS SUCK. Get a life get a PC and get a good OS and so on. Macs are crap they aren't compatible with other OS's. ha ha.

Woz

To some extent, an OS that does a lot for you becomes unstable and slower.

I have a lot of Linux servers at my site and they crash on occasion, as do the Macintosh servers. But for the most part you have good points. It's just that you'd be better heard by everyone if you avoided statements like "Macs suck." In saying that you instantly get most people (not myself necessarily) thinking that you just want to be critical and not contributory.

A good OS is like your friend. Personal computer users like to use their computers a lot and spend virtually no time upkeeping them or installing them. They aren't very technical either. The requirement of the technical ability to install Linux is out of the question for most PC users. Having to have a Linux expert around to fix and install and setup and explain things is unrealistic to most people that don't want to do it themselves.

Perhaps there will be local shops that maintain Linux machines someday and then we'll all have a better world.

I want to write a book

in
Comment from E-mail

My uncles and cousins all have peecees!! I can't take it anymore and they are planning to buy new ones. My sister wants a Compaq and so do my parents ( they say it's cheaper to maintain upgrade and all that stuff), they know nothing!!! My sister is comparing the newest Compaq to my old Mac. What am I going to do? Last thing I want to mention today: I want to write some type of novel, I don't understand how they make their books so thick? (as in coming up with content) I might be able to write about myself If I concentrated I could get anywhere from 300-800 pages maybe, but is my life interesting enough that people would want to read about it, I mean I can't even write a grammatically correct e-mail, not to mention all the fancy words that authors use. What are your views on this?

Woz

If your stories are interesting, an editor can help the grammar.

Guru of Computers

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Comment from E-mail

I read an aritcle on ram magazine (greek mag.) about you and steve jobs...:) I read that you are a guru of computers and I thought that if you weren't around, probably there will not be many things as they are now ... sorry for my english but I am from greece so you know...I am 16 years old and I like pc's very much...

Woz

I am greatly honored. Don't forget that my contributions to the earliest popular home computer wouldn't have been noticed if Apple hadn't done well as a company...Woz

I'm the sole Mac user

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Comment from E-mail

I hope I'm not exploiting access to your e-mail (it may be readily available, I don't know), but I'm the sole Mac user in a company of hundreds of PC users, and I'm very encouraged by Apple's last two years. I'm wondering if you can give me some encouragement for the future.

Woz

I can't add to what you can deduce for yourself. At least we Macintosh owners aren't experiencing the level of fear now that we did before..

Would you ever go back to Apple?

in
Question from E-mail

My questions are these: (1) why did Jobs leave Apple? (2) will Apple be able to go after the home computer market with the iMac and regain its dominance as the personal computer maker it should be? (3) would you ever go back to Apple?

Woz

Quite a few people in the company saw Steve's management style as bad for Apple and not in line with how they ran companies. Steve tried to wrench the company on a different path, and schemed to try and have our CEO, John Sculley, removed. John caught wind of it and things wound up with Steve having the freedom to start a project of his own but not to manage the Macintosh or other Apple products at that time. It was like a strong demotion. Steve took it very hard and personal. Instead of trying to do something positive within Apple, he left to try and outdo Apple on his own. It left a feeling among most Apple people of disloyalty to Apple.

My own feeling is that Steve thought he was so great that he would succeed larger than Apple outside of Apple. Also, that he didn't like finding that he was not on top at Apple. He would say that he seemed meant for this great role in life and that it was impossible to do within Apple any longer and that's why he left. There are a lot of credible explanations, but the truth is hard to know for sure.

The iMac has some impressive sales figures, but it hasn't brought Apple out of a dangerously low market share. Something more revolutionary will be needed for that.

I can't see myself going back to Apple. I don't like stress and conflicts and I have a great life even though I'm constantly busy.

Apple should be more open

in
Question from E-mail

Do you think Jobs will ever "Get it"? Let me explain what I mean. The PC was a bad computer. It was slow and had a poor OS. What I feel made the PC take off was the fact that the systems were open. Within a year of the release of the first IBM you had several other companies making the same products. When IBM went to the PS/2 (Micro BUS) to cut out competers, the PS/2 failed, so IBM learned and went back to the ISA/EISA/PCI bus and now IBM is doing better. Apple allowed Clones 3 years ago and did badly (I think because the quality went down on the MAC for a while then it came back). My point is do you think Apple will ever open it's system again? I feel they should have opened the first MACs back in 84. If they had, Apple might own part of MS, not the other way around. I would like any of your comment or personal observation.

Woz

We did so well in the days when we had extremely open products. But Steve Jobs has always tried to make them tighter and more closed. He says that it's beneficial to the user not to have all the many permutations of configurations.

We basically only had one disagreement over the Apple ][ design. He tried to get me to go with 2 slots instead of 8. I stood for 8 and told him he could find another computer. Call it artistic license. It paid off in the long run. But from that day on, he always tries to have less flexablitiy and variation possible in our computers than PC's have. He tries to define a machine for one purpose and precisely configured for it. But people always want other things too.

You find a ton of people like I was once, engineers and technicians, who can buy PC subassemblies and chips and can make breadboards and you don't even have magazines telling how to do this on Macs. I have no further comment.

Can you donate me an iMac?

in
Question from E-mail

My name is Peter Jaramillo and I am a Computer teacher at an elementary school in Santa Rosa Ca, I have been trained as a PC specialist and software around the Wintel environment, I never touched an Apple until I got the job in January, well it turns out that I had a lot of studying to do! I bought some great books on Mac computers, the school has iMacs in the classroom. I dont have any money to buy an iMac and they have been nice enough to let me borrow one during Easter vacation, since summer vacation is here, I would very much like to have an iMac of my very own to learn as much as I can about the MAC OS. I would be very happy if you can donate me an iMac, if you cant I will understand. I am still youre fan!

Woz

Apple got a lot of respect in the education market and one major reason was a program long ago in which we gave a computer to every public school in California. Actually, the state passed a law that year that made this very inexpensive for us, so you can thank the taxpayers even more. But I, individually, have given so many computers to schools around the country that I can't keep doing it forever. It's like I'll run out, see? So, I'm glad that you want the iMac and I'm glad that you want to learn, but I'm not able to give you one.

You have to ask for such things sometimes, and it can pay off, so don't feel like not asking others. I remember once when Steve Jobs needed some money and he called Bill Hewlett (or Dave Packard) directly and asked for it. He didn't get the money, but they found a summer job for him.

the NTSC issue

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Question from E-mail

I use six-hour video tapes to record long radio programs; the problem was, without a video signal the audio tended to glitch (this is a not uncommon problem I'm told). So I needed a video source. I immediately thought of doing a simple display on the computer -- program title and an elapsed-time clock -- but hey! Macs and PCs don't do NTSC video without an expensive peripheral card! Rats!

At which point I turned to the Apple II I thought I had put away for good* and whipped up a lores graphics character generator. Problem solved.

Woz

This is a surprising and amusing story. The best ones are often the true ones.

I, myself, use a PowerBook. Recent PowerBook models, including the one I'm using right now, have NTSC out (U.S. version). Look how many marketing folks have to make presentations. Some are probably still done on TV's. Also, TV's are very popular for the teacher to present in classrooms, costing much less than computer quality monitors (which are smaller physically) and projectors.

Pc or Mac?

in
Question from E-mail

My question is, would you personally have any hesitancy at this point in time to make a fairly large investment in a Macintosh computer? I want to go with Mac, but I keep getting hit with "PC's are just as good and less expensive" and "Mac OS isn't going to be around much longer." Since I am NOT an engineer who understands the details of operating systems, a lot of the explanations of why PC's have or have not caught up are lost on me. But I do know that my computers have been a dream to work on.

Woz

My time is pretty short and these are just my opinions:

The answer is possibly in what you need to do with the computer. Different platforms might have an advantage for certain tasks. Assuming that the PC and Mac both qualify here, the answer is in your own psychology. Do you want to be a part of the Mac struggle. We are a closely knit group that tries to help each other a lot and find solutions when they are needed. Because it's more important to us, we are extremely passionate about our platform. You might prefer the safety of the most (not best) software selections or the most friends to help you fix things. It's no fun to fix any computer problem, but from what I hear, PC's are much much worse here.

I hope that this helps you. It's strange, asking ME to advise you for or against the Mac.