• September 2011
  • September 2011

     

    Steve Wozniak telling a joke about Steve Jobs

  • September 2011

    Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak shares the story of lost Apple founder Ron Wayne - an original founder of Apple who bowed out of the company just before the company hit big. It is a cautionary tale he shares with Patrick Bet-David, founder of People Helping People at the company's annual conference.

  • September 2011

    Third founder of Apple

  • September 2011

    With the dust still settling from Tesla Motors' win in the Silicon Challenge over Apple co-founder Steve Jobs, fellow co-founder Steve Wozniak steps up to take on venture capitalist Tim Draper. The question, as it has been throughout this series of polls, is, "Which best represents Silicon Valley?" The Woz beat former Apple Evangelist Guy Kawasaki in Round 1.

  • September 2011

    Woz, for his part, shrugged off the hack and continues to tweet daily about what sounds like a vacation through Wyoming. Last night he checked into the Split Creek Ranch lodge in Jackson, Wyoming, according to Twitter.

  • September 2011

    Ronald G. Wayne, best known as the third "forgotten" founder of the Apple Computer Company, has written an autobiography that is now available at booksellers everywhere.

    Los Angeles, California (PRWEB) September 07, 2011

    It is widely known that in the late 1970s Steve Jobs

  • September 2011

    “I met Kevin Mitnick for the first time in 2011, during the filming of a Discovery Channel documentary called ‘The History of Hacking,’ and we continued the contact,” writes Apple cofounder Steve Wozniak in the forward to Mitnick’s new book “Ghost in the Wires: My Adventures as the World’s Most Wanted Hacker.” Wozniak goes on to write that “my life has changed by Kevin. He has become one of my best friends. I love being around him, hearing the stories about his exploits.”

  • August 2011

    Apple co-founder and entrepreneur Steve Wozniak took the final match in the first round of the Silicon Challenge, rounding out the 20 people, places and things that remain in competition to settle the question: Which best represents Silicon Valley?

  • August 2011

    To understand the cultural significance of Steve Jobs, you have to go back in time: to before the iPad or iPhone or iTunes, before Apple Inc.’s comeback products made candy-colored plastics and iAnything cool, before Jobs got kicked out of Apple, even before the Macintosh hurled a sledgehammer at Big Brother. It’s 1981. Most people have never heard of Silicon Valley. The country’s most famous businessman is Lee Iacocca, the head of Chrysler Corp. He’s famous because in 1979 he engineered a government bailout -- loan guarantees -- that saved the company. He’s also famous because, unlike his peers, Iacocca is colorful. He seems to believe in what he’s doing.